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Donkey Konga is a series of rythm video games part of the Donkey Kong series, developed by Namco and published by Nintendo for the GameCube, designed to play with the DK Bongos peripherial. This page lists all Donkey Konga songs that come from other series (the North American release of Donkey Konga 2 is not listed since it doeasn't feature any song from other series).

These all create a Type 2 link because Donkey Kong and other selectable characters are seen playing the songs on their bongos, meaning that these series are fictional within Donkey Kong's universe.

Donkey Konga (Japanese version)

20031212 December 12, 2003

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Donkey Kong4Arrow L other series

The Japanese release of Donkey Konga features 32 playable songs, and 12 of these are from other series:

From the Donkey Kong series there are the "Monkey Rap" from Donkey Kong 64 and the Donkey Konga theme itself. However the DK Rap in this game is actually its arrangement from Super Smash Bros. Melee.

Additionally "Ashita e no Tobira", the Ainori theme, is also playable, but being a reality TV show, it's not a fictional series.

Donkey Konga 2 (Japanese version)

2004071 July 1, 2004

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Donkey Kong4Arrow L other series

Donkey Konga 2 features 32 playable songs, and 16 of these are from other series:

From the Donkey Kong series there are the Super Donkey Kong theme (Donkey Kong Country music) and "Donkey Kong A Go Go!!", the Donkey Konga 2 theme itself. However the Donkey Kong Country music in this game is actually its arrangement from Super Smash Bros. Melee.

Donkey Konga (American version)

20040927 September 27, 2004

2in

Donkey Kong4Arrow L other series

The North American release of Donkey Konga features 33 playable songs, but only 3 of these are from other series:

From the Donkey Kong series there are the "DK Rap" from Donkey Kong 64 and the Donkey Konga theme itself. However the DK Rap in this game is actually its arrangement from Super Smash Bros. Melee.

Donkey Konga (European version)

20041015 October 15, 2004

2in

Donkey Kong4Arrow L other series

The European release of Donkey Konga features 31 playable songs, but only 4 of these are from other series:

From the Donkey Kong series there are "Donkey Kong Country theme", actually "Jungle Groove" from Donkey Kong Country, the "DK Rap" from Donkey Kong 64 and the Donkey Konga theme itself. However the DK Rap in this game is actually its arrangement from Super Smash Bros. Melee.

Donkey Konga 3

Donkey Konga 3 - Songlist

Donkey Konga 3 - Songlist

All starting songs in Donkey Konga 3.

2005317 March 17, 2005

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Donkey Kong4Arrow L other series

Donkey Konga 3: Tabe-houdai! Haru Mogitate 50 Kyoku, only released in Japan, features 35 starting playable songs, and 14 of these are from other series:

From the Donkey Kong series there are Donkey Kong Jungle Beat theme, "Banana Tengoku", ending theme of the Donkey Kong animated series, "Ashita ni Nattara", opening theme of the Donkey Kong animated series, and "Donkey's Groove", the Donkey Konga 3 theme itself.

"Doremifa Daijōbu", the Hajimete no Otsukai theme, is also playable, but being a reality TV show, it's not a fictional series.

Additionally there also is the song "Go!!!" by Flow, which is used as the opening theme #4 for Naruto, but since it's not specified as such in the game, is just considered a generic J-pop song.

Famicom songs

The game then features 21 unlockable songs listed in the "Famicom" category, that are unaltered 8-bit music from Famicom games:

DKonga Famicom tracklist

List of Famicom songs in Donkey Konga 3 from the game's official site.

Donkey Konga 2 (European version)

200563 June 3, 2005

2in

Donkey Kong4Arrow L other series

The European release of Donkey Konga 2 features 34 playable songs, but only 2 of these are from other series:

Additionally, the Donkey Konga 2 theme itself is a playable song in the game.

License

The Donkey Konga games were produced by Namco and published by Nintendo, so they could freely include music from their own series. Additionally they were able to include songs from other series obtaining the license from their respective owners, but apparently only for the Japanese releases of the games, since the American and European versions of the games don't feature any song from series other than Nintendo's.